Phi Sigma Sigma, Theta Chapter

902 S. 2nd Street,

Champaign, IL 61820

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LITP

Phi Sigma Sigma, National Headquarters

​8178 Lark Brown Road, Suite 202
Elkridge, MD 21075

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National History of Phi Sigma Sigma

       Phi Sigma Sigma is a proud, strong member of the Greek community because our Founders were leaders of their time who developed a mission to perpetuate the advancement of womanhood. They believed that women of different faiths could come together and work toward common goals. They established the ideals that endure today and are upheld by Phi Sigma Sigma collegians and alumnae bound by the strength of sisterhood. Membership in Phi Sigma Sigma remains a lifelong, meaningful experience for women with like values.

       In 1913, our Founders approached the Dean of Women at Hunter College in New York City with a vision. They wanted to start a sorority that would promote open membership to all women of character regardless of background; a sorority committed to sisterhood, excellence in scholarship, and selfless giving.

       On November 26, 1913, Phi Sigma Sigma was born. It was the first nonsectarian sorority; the only one that was open to diverse membership from inception and the only one with a ritual that was not based in any one religion. Under the leadership of Fay Chertkoff (our first chapter archon), Alpha Chapter was installed at Hunter College. 

       The Theta Chapter at the University of Illinois, founded in 1923, introduced our ideals to mid-west campuses. Phi Sigma Sigma became an associate member of National Panhellenic Conference (NPC) in 1947, and a full member in 1951.

       Phi Sigma Sigma has shaped the priorities of its sisters throughout the decades. Our sisterhood and love for Phi Sigma Sigma bind us together and encourage us to always work toward our twin ideals. Today, Phi Sigma Sigma maintains 115 healthy, active collegiate chapters in the United States and Canada, supports over 100 alumnae chapters, and has more than 70,000 members worldwide.

Our Founders